Chamblee54

28th Amendment

Posted in Uncategorized by chamblee54 on February 10, 2010


PG got a message yesterday about a proposed 28th amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The proposed amendment deals with Congress, and their responsibility to obey the laws that they pass. Here is the message.

For too long we have been too complacent about the workings of Congress. Many citizens had no idea that Congressmembers:
1-could retire with the same pay and benefits after only one term.
2-that they didn’t pay into Social Security.
3-that they specifically exempted themselves from many of the laws they have passed, such as being exempt from any fear of prosecution for sexual harassment (now why would that be?), while ordinary citizens must live under those laws.
4-The latest is to exempt themselves from the Healthcare Reform that is being considered…in all of its’ forms.
Somehow, that doesn’t seem logical. We do not have an elite that is above the law. I truly don’t care if they are Democrat, Republican, Independent or whatever. The self-serving must stop. Below is a good way to do that. It is an idea whose time has come.

Proposed 28th Amendment to the United States Constitution:
The People’s Amendment
“Congress shall make no law that applies to the citizens of the
United States that does not apply equally to the Senators and Representatives;
and, Congress shall make no law that applies to the Senators and Representatives
that does not apply equally to the citizens of the United States “.

PG has a few bones to pick. To begin with, most citizens do not raise millions of dollars to run election campaigns. Campaign finance reform would (in theory) solve some of the corruption issues in Washington. Should these laws should apply to citizens who do not run large scale campaigns?

There are 535 senators and representatives. While it is obnoxious for these people to be immune from certain types of prosecution, PG wonders how much difference this really makes.

Constitutional Amendments are notoriously tough to get ratified. It takes approval by three fourths of the states. The last one to be ratified, the 27th, was ratified in 1992. It was first proposed September 25, 1789. The 27th states that a congressional pay raise will not take effect until after an election.

Item 4 on the list above…exemption from health care reform ( which has not passed the Congress, and may not)… is a bit ironic. Sometimes too much privilege can be a problem.

US Representative John Murtha died recently, from complications after gall bladder surgery. Mr. Murtha, a Vietnam Veteran, had been a fierce critic of the war in Babylon. Many feel that this war opposition focused attention on him, and brought some of his ethical shortcomings to light.

The surgery was performed at the National Naval Hospital in Bethesda MD. A commenter to the cited article makes this point:

Having practiced military medicine, I know that when a celebrity patient enters a military facility, it is likely that his or her care will be assumed by a ranking physician. In the case of surgery, this is not always a good situation for the patient. Being occupied by administrative details, the higher ranked surgeon may not in the operating room daily honing his skills. If you have a choice, always pick a surgeon who does a lot of surgery and does it every day, regardless of his rank.. Endoscopic removal of the gall bladder is an operation that requires constant practice to be perfected.

Pictures are from ” Special Collections and Archives,Georgia State University Library”.

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