Chamblee54

Lene Lovich

Posted in Uncategorized by chamblee54 on May 13, 2010



Lene Lovich was born Lili-Marlene Premilovich in Detroit, Michigan, March 30, 1949. She moved to England as a teenager, and met Les Chappell. He who played guitar in her band, and was the man in her life.

As an art school student, she started to tie her long hair in plaits to keep it out of the clay while studying sculpture. Her recording debut was as part of an audience, when Chuck Berry recorded “My ding a ling”.

Miss Lovich played in several bands, before winding up on the Stiff label. She put out two albums that became popular in the USA, and did a tour. After a while, she retired from music to raise a family, and has made a slight comeback in recent years.

PG had the privilege of seeing Lene Lovich at the Agora Ballroom, Atlanta GA, in the winter of 1980. The opening act was The Romantics. The show was taped for broadcast on the NBC radio network, and Don Pardo was on hand to introduce the bands.

The Romantics were unknown to the crowd at the Agora that night. They came on stage wearing costumes that looked like the Beatles of 1963. Every song they did was a bit better than the one before, and they got a big round of applause when the set ended.

Don Pardo had quite a career. He was the house announcer on November 22, 1963, and was the voice of NBC when he interrupted a soap opera to announce that John Kennedy had been “cut down with assassin’s bullets”. During his career as a TV announcer, Mr. Pardo could not use profanity. That night at the Agora, he made up for lost time…every other word he said was a cuss word.

Soon, Lene Lovich (spell check suggestion:lovechild) and her band came on stage. She was not the typical sexpot rock chanteuse… A bit chubby, with her long hair tied in plaits. Wearing a long sleeve black dress, probably stolen from a convent, she provided fantasy for only the kinkiest. Les Chappell was there, with his shaved head, to stop any trouble before it started, and play guitar.

The material came mostly from the first two albums on Stiff records. ( At some point in the evening, someone…maybe Lovich, maybe Pardo…said “Be stiff”.) She introduced “Lucky Number” by saying ” We have a song that goes ah oh aih oh”. During an instrumental jam in that song, she cried out “We have an American on keyboards”. The American was Thomas Dolby, who would soon go solo, and have a few hits.

The first encore was ” I think we’re alone now”, which had been a hit for Tommy James and the Shondells (spell check suggestions: shoulders, shovelfuls). Soon the night was over. Pictures for this feature are from the ” Special Collections and Archives,Georgia State University Library”.

5 Responses

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  1. Jim said, on November 15, 2011 at 5:36 pm

    Great comments.
    My two cents on the evening at The Agora was that it seemed to me that the local HOT radio station WQXI and record promoters for The Romantics had sold out the show to their cronies. I’ll back up a bit here; the show was sold out. I know that I, and friends of mine, who had wanted to go see Ms. Lovich couldn’t get in. I would say that The Romantics were more popular than Lene Lovich. They were touring for “What I Like About You”. But, it wasn’t enough for a sellout, especially in an age restrictive club. The Romantics were strictly teeny bopper material.

  2. […] Parker had looked like Bruce Springsteen, he would have been a superstar. In March of 1980, Lene Lovich came to the Agora. About a year later, Spirit  played on Peachtree Street. The show was sponsored […]

  3. Lene Lovich « Chamblee54 said, on May 12, 2012 at 11:47 am

    […] the ” Special Collections and Archives,Georgia State University Library” This is a repost. […]

  4. Lene Lovich | Chamblee54 said, on May 29, 2014 at 7:58 pm

    […] the ” Special Collections and Archives,Georgia State University Library” This is a repost. UPDATE: This comment was left on facebook “Those first two albums are GREAT. I probably saw […]

  5. […] If Graham Parker looked like Bruce Springsteen, he would have been a superstar. In March of 1980, Lene Lovich came to the Agora. About a year later, Spirit played on Peachtree Street. The show was sponsored by […]


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