Chamblee54

Was Mohandas Gandhi A Racist?

Posted in History, Library of Congress, Quotes, Race by chamblee54 on February 11, 2017

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A meme appeared on facebook, “GHANDI’S 7 DANGERS TO HUMAN VIRTUE.” Below the misspelled name were seven concepts, written in all caps. This got PG thinking.

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (M.K. Gandhi) “was born was born on October 2, 1869, at Porbandar, a small town on the western coast of India.” At some point the title Mahatma was applied, and is often used as though it was his name. Exact transliterations between languages using different alphabets is tricky. What is the “correct” spelling of this man’s last name? Most sources today use Gandhi.

Another term, Gandhiji, turns up in the research. “‘Ji’ in Hindi or Urdu is a suffix used after the names of respectable persons and elders like father and mother. It is used every day by millions of Indians to address their elders.Hence Gandhiji is but Mahatma Gandhi,father of our nation,addressed reverently and respectfully. We call mother mataji. Mata means mother.”

The quote in the meme is real. It is found on page 135 of Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi Vol. 33. It was in an article found in Young India on October 22, 1925.

“SEVEN SOCIAL SIN The same fair friend wants readers of Young India to know, if they do not already, the following seven social sins: Politics without principles, Wealth without work, Pleasure without conscience, Knowledge without character, Commerce without morality, Science without humanity, Worship without sacrifice. Naturally, the friend does not want the readers to know these things merely through the intellect but to know them through the heart so as to avoid them.”

The next entry in the collected works is interesting. “79. THAT ETERNAL QUESTION However much I may wish to avoid it, the Hindu-Muslim question will not avoid me. Muslim friends insist upon my intervention to solve it. The Hindu friends would have me discuss it with them and some of them say I have sown the wind and must reap the whirlwind.”

The meme had comments. Lloyd Lachow Gandhi was intensely racist. Joanne Gibson Gandhi was not intensely racist. Fighting racism was his first cause. John Janiga Gandhi racist??? John Taylor Lloyd, were you born an idiot, or did you have to work at it?

This looks like a job for Mr. Google. When you type the phrase “Is Gandhi,” suggested searches include “sill alive” and “on netflix.” This does not help if you want to know if someone is racist.

Mr. Gandhi lived in South Africa from 1893-1915. During this time he was offended at the treatment of Indian nationals, which led to a decision to fight for Indian rights. Unfortunately, these rights were not to be extended to the native South Africans.

gandhi misspelled240 … there’s no doubting that Gandhi had little time for black people. During his 21 years in South Africa, he repeatedly expressed contempt for the native population, claiming they were no better than the “untouchables” of Indian society. One speech in particular stands out. In 1896, he was quoted as referring to black South Africans as the “raw kaffir, whose occupation is hunting and whose sole ambition is to collect a certain number of cattle to buy a wife with, and then pass his life in indolence and nakedness.” For those of you who aren’t up on your South African slang, “kaffir” is a direct equivalent of our N-word. Another time, he complained about finding himself in a “kaffir” prison, claiming Indians were “above” natives, who “are troublesome, very dirty and live like animals.”

There is the story of the Durban Post Office. “The first major accomplishment of the Natal Indian Congress was to further entrench racial segregation into South African society during a time of massive racial strife. At the time, the Durban, South Africa post office had two doors. One was for whites and the other for Indians and black natives. Gandhi was so disgusted at having to share a door with blacks that he initiated a campaign for the creation of a third door. … A year later, after the issue had already been resolved, Gandhi chose to expound upon his reasons for raising it in the first place. In his August 14, 1896 letter, “The Grievances of the British Indians in South Africa: An Appeal to the Indian Public,” he called being “put on the same level with the native” a “disability.”

This is a repost. Pictures are from The Library of Congress.

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Dolly Parton And Paula Deen

Posted in History, Library of Congress, Politics, Quotes, Race, The English Language by chamblee54 on January 19, 2017

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Dolly Parton celebrates a birthday today. The internet is a love fest for her, and deservedly so. Miss Parton has given joy to millions, with her singing and acting.

Paula Deen was born on the same day, one year later. While her star did not shine quite as bright as Miss Parton, Mrs. Deen made her contribution to american life. The only problem was a bad boss lawsuit against a company Mrs. Deen invested in. A lawyer got Mrs. Deen to admit, under oath, the she had said the n-word. Paula Deen became a pariah.

Dolly Parton and Paula Deen have a few things in common. Miss Parton is married to Carl Thomas Dean, and her legal name is Mrs. Dean. Both ladies are from the south, the hills of East Tennessee, and the flatland of Albany, Georgia. Both grew up in an era where the n-word was what white people called black people.

What if the story had been different. What if it was a restaurant at Dollywood where the manager was not happy? What if this white woman, who was treated better because she was a white woman, decided to claim racial discrimination in her bad boss lawsuit? (Page 153 of deposition.) What if the disgruntled employee’s lawyer was smarter than Dolly Parton’s lawyer? We might have had tabloids screaming nonstop that Dolly Parton said the n-word.

Pictures are from The Library of Congress, taken at “Annual “Bathing Girl Parade”, Balboa Beach, CA, June 20, 1920.” No one asked these ladies if they ever said the n-word. This is a repost. Other celebrities born on January 19: Robert E. Lee (1807), Edgar Allan Poe (1809), Jean Stapleton (1923), Janis Joplin (1943), and Desi Arnaz Jr.(1953.)

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Godwin’s Law

Posted in GSU photo archive, Politics, Quotes, Race, The Internet, Undogegorized by chamblee54 on December 6, 2016

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Godwin’s Law has become an internet staple. “As an online discussion continues, the probability of a reference or comparison to Hitler or Nazis approaches 1.” Mike Godwin created this rule around 1990, when Saddam Hussein was the official next Hitler.

GL filled a need, and has flourished. GL is also misused, as when people say GL has been “proved” or “violated.” Mr. Godwin does not “personally believe all rational discourse has ended when Nazis or the Holocaust are invoked.” GL hopefully sparks critical thinking, and enables people to see through the smoky rhetoric. Maybe, if you act appropriately, you can put out the fire that causes that smoke.

The Washington Post published the article cited above. Recently, a Post reporter found an article praising Donald Trump in The Crusader. This is a 12 page newspaper, published in Harrison, Arkansas. It calls itself “The official Newspaper of The Knights Party.”

Once the Post got wind of this, it morphed into KKK’s official newspaper supports Donald Trump for president. This chestnut got into the national political discussion, where it was accepted without question. The KKK endorses Donald Trump!!! Surely, he is the next Hitler. Orange hair has replaced the little mustache. The national pearl clutching grew so intense that the pearls fell off the string.

Mr. Godwin made a mistake. “It’s still true, of course, that the worst thing you can say about your opponents, in our culture, is that they’re like Hitler or the Nazis.” No, the worst thing you can say about someone today is that they are RACIST. The scarlet R is a damaging charge. Those accused are guilty until proven innocent. The fact that many say RACISM as a thoughtless reflex action does not diminish the power. Some would say that Mr. Godwin’s assertion that the Nazi label is the worst possible insult… that it is worse than saying RACIST … that this statement itself is RACIST.

Maybe this is an extension of Godwin’s Law. As any discussion of american life progresses, the likelihood of invoking the KKK, and the R word, increases. Many see Hitler comparisons as the end of rationality in a discussion. What do white sheet jokes say about the person making the charge?

While researching this post, I dug up an article, Racism In America Is Over. The feature was published December 30, 2008. A charismatic son-of-a-white-mother had just been elected POTUS. The salient quote is more true today than ever: “When decrying racism opens no door and teaches no skill, it becomes a schoolroom tattletale affair. It is unworthy of all of us: “He’s just a racist” intoned like “nyah nyah nyah nyah nyah!””

Twitter hosted a recent exchange. It refers to a comment made by the ex-wife of Steve Bannon, during a divorce. @carlreiner “I, a Jew, was willing to give Trump a chance til I heard his cheif of staff say he’d not allow his kids to go to a school if Jews attended.” @hausmuva “translation: I was willing to empower whiteness/white supremacy until I learned that I may not be considered white in the white imagination.” Maybe this twitteration can be included in a future edition of Reductio ad hitlerum : Une théorie du point Godwin.

Maybe it is time to calm down the name calling… be it Der Führer or Grand Dragon … and get down to the hard work of getting along with each other. Pictures today are from “The Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library”.

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Two Tweets

Posted in Library of Congress, Politics, Quotes, Race, The Internet by chamblee54 on December 2, 2016

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Twitter can be a fun place to visit. Yesterday, this item floated ashore: @BlakeTheSequel “@kat_blaque GIRL. I have gotten into it with soooo many people over RuPaul’s coonery w/regards to Lucien Piane. I got put in Facebook jail!.” Urban Dictionary defines coonery as “Acting in such a manner as to perpetuate black stereotypes in society such as music videos solely about cars, money and women. / Pejorative term to describe behavior that is seen as unbecoming of African-Americans.” As we will see in a minute, this is a versatile term.

Music producer and songwriter Lucian Piane sometimes works with RuPaul. Mr. Piane, aka @RevoLucian, might have emotional problems. There is a series of tweets, presented here with the naughty word StarrBootied out. @RevoLucian“If black people stopped being so ashamed of themselves we could call them n*****s and they would laugh. Backwards shit.” @RevoLucian“I love @RuPaul, and he’s the wisest n*****r I know”@RevoLucian“If Jews stopped the Holocaust victim shit we would all get along. #truth” @RevoLucian“Someone please explain why Chinese guys have such tiny dicks…” @RevoLucian No drugs. Just divine inspiration.

@RuPaul has replied. @RuPaul “If you only knew how fragile your own mental health is, you wouldn’t be so cavalier.” @RuPaul “Show some compassion. Please.” @RuPaul “You can’t expect your factory job to come back AND continue shopping at Walmart.”

@chescaleigh “I’m not offended by ppl calling me Franny, but i think it’s telling that randoms online use in an attempt to speak down to me @JayShabazz” PG has interacted with Franchesca Ramsey before. It come to an end. @Chamblee54 “@chescaleigh when you say the n-word you demean yourself it is in your best interest not to use it” You are blocked from following @chescaleigh and viewing @chescaleigh’s Tweets. #tweetthatgotmeblocked

@JayShabazz aka Rick, is a “Breitbart and Sowell fan! I love the context, facts and logic! kinda agnostic. I also love comic books.” He has 118 followers, or 20 more than @Chamblee54. He may, or may not, have sent out a tweet yesterday. (Pro tip: If you see something that interests you, copy the link. You may not be able to find it later.) The comment was something about Barack Obama having Larry Sinclair killed in a hit and run accident. Maybe it was @RevoLucian who sent the tweet.

Larry Sinclair was a minor celebrity a few years ago. He peddled a strange story about a cocaine fueled “date” with State Senator Barack Obama. Mr. Sinclair gave a bizarre press conference, which ended with Mr. Sinclair being arrested. A book was written, Barack Obama & Larry Sinclair: Cocaine, Sex, Lies & Murder? The book was published after Mr. Obama won the election.

November 14, 2011 is the date of the alleged hit and run accident. If you google “Larry Sinclair hit and run” you will see some reports from sketchy websites. Google does not seem to have much information about whether, or not, these reports are accurate. Wikipedia does not have a page for Larry Sinclair. The Larry Sinclair website will harm your computer. For some reason, Larry Sinclair seems to have vanished. Pictures today are from The Library of Congress.

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Dorothy Parker and Thomas Jefferson

Posted in History, Library of Congress, Poem, Quotes by chamblee54 on November 2, 2016

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BigO is a site with mp3 downloads. Most of them are concerts. PG found one exception. It was a 1960 interview, STUDS TERKEL WITH DOROTHY PARKER/BOB NEWHART – CHICAGO 1959/1960. Pictures today are from The Library of Congress.

Dorothy Parker is somewhat of a legend. There were the funny sayings, a few poems and stories, and her life. Mrs. Parker was well known as a witty person during the twenties. She drank, a lot, and talked often of suicide. It was surprising to find a 1960 interview.

In fact, Dorothy Parker died in 1967, at the age of 73. By 1960, she was in decline, living at the Manhattan’s Volney Hotel. “Edmund Wilson … paid occasional painful visits to her at the Volney. (“She lives with a small and nervous bad-smelling poodle bitch, drinks a lot, and does not care to go out.”) … She was still revered, a legend, but she had also become a pathetic relic. Yes, “you might as well live,” but for what? And on what? Not only was she running out of old friends, she was running out of money, though uncashed checks, some quite large, were strewn around her apartment (along with the empty bottles), not helping with unpaid bills.”

There were some zesty quotes in the interview with Mr. Terkel. “I can’t call myself a critic. Honestly. I can only put down what I think and pray there isn’t a libel suit.” “I’m not a poet, you know, I just write verse” “The beat boys aren’t saying anything except look at us aren’t we great … I don’t think the beat generation is much worth worrying about. Very soon, in the very near future, they will be as forgotten as mah jongg.”

Towards the end of the interview, Mr. Terkel said “i know some people would want me to ask, did she really say all those things that she was quoted as saying” “… no, no, and it was a curse on me, it was simply awful the things that were attributed to me. I wouldn’t have minded if they had been good. I was, in effect, the shaggy dog of my time.”

Another quote magnet for the meme generation is Thomas Jefferson. PG saw yet another inspiring quote on facebook today. Mr. Google was consulted. It turns out the quote is real.

Thomas Jefferson to William Hamilton, 22 April 1800 is the source. Vice President Jefferson was going to be elected President later that year. It is not known what effect that had on the quote in the meme. “I never considered a difference of opinion in politics, in religion, in philosophy, as cause for withdrawing from a friend.” It is not known whether a twenty first century Jefferson would unfriends anyone who says anything unappealing.

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Tom Paine

Posted in History, Library of Congress, Quotes, The Internet by chamblee54 on October 22, 2016

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There is a meme floating through the innertubes. “To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead.” Thomas Paine English-American political activist, writer and revolutionary. A drawing of Mr. Paine lurks to the left of the text.

The quote is from the first paragraph of a pamphlet written by Mr. Paine, The American Crisis: LANCASTER, March 21, 1778, TO GENERAL SIR WILLIAM HOWE. It was part five of a series, The American Crisis. The tract was intended to inspire the war effort against the British. The full sentence: “To argue with a man who has renounced the use and authority of reason, and whose philosophy consists in holding humanity in contempt, is like administering medicine to the dead, or endeavoring to convert an atheist by scripture.”

Four Principles of Quotation was written in 2002, before the rise of meme culture. The salient principle for today is number four, “Only quote from works that you have read.” The tract by Mr. Paine is 6956 words of revolutionary era purple prose. Today’s facebook expressionist does not want to go to that much trouble.

The American Crisis V has some interesting passages. It would be considered politically incorrect today. The British labelled is “the encourager of Indian cruelties,” and accused of “the unchangeable name of meanness.”… “The particular act of meanness which I allude to in this description, is forgery. You, sir, have abetted and patronized the forging and uttering counterfeit continental bills. … shows an inbred wretchedness of heart made up between the venomous malignity of a serpent and the spiteful imbecility of an inferior reptile.”

The text is directed at General William Howe. The war was not going well for the British… “They resemble the labors of a puppy pursuing his tail; the end is still at the same distance, and all the turnings round must be done over again.” General Howe resigned April 4, 1778, fifteen days after The American Crisis V was written. The purple prose might have been a factor.

“Your master’s speech at the opening of Parliament, is like a soliloquy on ill luck. It shows him to be coming a little to his reason, for sense of pain is the first symptom of recovery, in profound stupefaction…. who is daily decaying into the grave with constitutional rottenness. There is not in the compass of language a sufficiency of words to express the baseness of your king, his ministry and his army. They have refined upon villany till it wants a name. To the fiercer vices of former ages they have added the dregs and scummings of the most finished rascality, and are so completely sunk in serpentine deceit, that there is not left among them one generous enemy. … She is the only power who could practise the prodigal barbarity of tying men to mouths of loaded cannon and blowing them away. … If there is a sin superior to every other, it is that of wilful and offensive war. … We leave it to England and Indians to boast of these honors; …”

Mr. Paine has a good reputation today. This was not unversal during the revolution. “In 1777, Congress named Paine secretary to the Committee for Foreign Affairs. The following year, however, Paine accused a member of the Continental Congress of trying to profit personally from French aid given to the United States. In revealing the scandal, Paine quoted from secret documents that he had accessed through his position at Foreign Affairs. Also around this time, in his pamphlets, Paine alluded to secret negotiations with France that were not fit for public consumption. These missteps eventually led to Paine’s expulsion from the committee in 1779.”

After the war, Mr. Paine went back to England. He soon got involved in the French Revolution, and was imprisoned. He continued to write, and get in trouble. Mr. Paine was invited back to the United States by Thomas Jefferson. He “died in June 1809, and to drive home the point of his tarnished image, the New York Citizen printed the following line in Paine’s obituary: “He had lived long, did some good and much harm.” Pictures today are from The Library of Congress.

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Frank Zappa Says

Posted in Library of Congress, Music, Politics, Quotes by chamblee54 on October 20, 2016

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Recently, the world of flaky internet quotes has discovered Frank Zappa. The “sexually incontinent rock innovator” died December 4, 1993. (His wife Gail passed away October 7, 2025.) Recently, some alleged quotes have hit the ether. Some people need to get out more. This is a repost.

This item was recently featured in chamblee54. @SlavojTweezek “”Communism doesn’t work,” Frank Zappa said, “because people like to own stuff.” Idiot. What do people’s likes have to do with communism?” This quote is plausible. Frank Zappa was a capitalist. He liked owning stuff, especially his own music. It should be easy to find a source. However, the best google can come up with is a compilation, “Quotes of Zappa,” in W. C. Privy’s Original Bathroom Companion.”

This morning, facebook had a meme. It had a picture of FZ, with the quote “Politics is the entertainment division of the military-industrial complex.” In the time that it takes to say Camarillo Brillo, Mr. Google turned up a reddit commentary.

“While the quote is frequently listed as, ““Government is the entertainment division of the military-industrial complex,” I could find no primary source. It appears to contradict the actual quote from a 1987 interview with Keyboard magazine where he is decidedly pro-government but anti-bullshit politics.” (FZ did say “art in the service of politics usually makes for boring art.” Why do people make up quotes for memes, when the real thing is better?)

Speculating what a dead man would say is a tricky business. FZ was known for strong opinions, and a finely tuned BS detector. (That is bovine excrement, not Bernie Sanders.) FZ died while the internet was just getting started, and years before some of today’s permutations and perversions. It is easy to imagine FZ making rude comments about people misquoting dead guitar heroes.

Speaking of politics and cynical guitar cadavers, the current poster boi for trendy privilege is Bernie Sanders. If you “feel the Bern,” you might want to skip over the rest of this post, and look at the pictures. (These pictures are from The Library of Congress.) While BS is arguably less evil than Hitlery, he still leaves a great deal to be desired. BS is making extravagant promises that he will be totally unable to keep. BS is taking the concept of telling people what they want to hear to new depths. Yes, this is part of what FZ meant when saying rude things about politicians.

Today, PG saw a fundraising appeal for BS. Against his better judgment, PG made the comment “Bernie $anders.” The fun started almost immediately.

This campaign is for monthly recurring contributions. And Luther, campaigning requires money. The alternative to grassroots support is a country run by wealthy interests. Which would you prefer? ~
I realize that campaigning for political office requires money. My comment was a bit of recreational $nark. B$ can take a joke. … “The alternative to grassroots support is a country run by wealthy interests.” I am not sure about that comparison. Hitlery can make more in one corporate blowjob than BS can in a month of grass roots support. BHO did not get a billion dollars for his reelection from five dollar contributions. While the concept of grassroots support is uplifting, the sordid reality is that we live in a bribe-ocracy. ~ Your cynicism is less than accurate and certainly less than appealing. ~ Luther, just don’t vote and stay out of discussions about voting. OK?

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Oscar Wilde

Posted in History, Library of Congress, Quotes by chamblee54 on October 18, 2016

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October 16 is Oscar Wilde’s birthday. On that day in 1854, he appeared in Dublin, Ireland. He is one of the most widely quoted people in the english language. Some of those quotes are real. Since he was a published author, it should be easy to verify what he really said. This belated birthday celebration is a repost, with pictures from The Library of Congress.

One night in 1974, PG was talking to someone, and did not know who Oscar Wilde was. The conversational partner was horrified. PG became educated, and learned about a misunderstanding with the Marquess of Queensberry. Soon the “Avenge Oscar Wilde” signs made sense.

Mr. Wilde once made a speaking tour in the United States. One afternoon, in Washington D.C., the playwright met Walt Whitman. Thee and thou reportedly did the “Wilde thing”.

The tour then went to Georgia. A young black man had been hired as a valet for Mr. Wilde on this tour. On the train ride from Atlanta to Augusta, some people told Mr. Wilde that he could not ride in the same car as the valet. This was very confusing.

After his various legal difficulties, Oscar Wilde moved to Paris. He took ill, while staying in a tacky hotel. He looked up, and said “either that wallpaper goes, or I do”. Soon, Oscar Wilde passed away.

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Seven Brilliant Quotes

Posted in Library of Congress, Quotes, Undogegorized by chamblee54 on September 2, 2016











There is a little graphic floating around, Seven Brilliant Quotes. Some find these sayings to be inspirational. PG smells a rat. Here are the seven quotes:

William Shakespeare – Never play with the feelings of others because you may win the game but the risk is that you will surely lose the person for a life time.
Napoleon Bonaparte – The world suffers a lot. Not because of the violence of bad people, but because of the silence of good people.
Albert Einstein – I am thankful to all those who said NO to me. Its because of them I did it myself.
Abraham Lincoln – If friendship is your weakest point then you are the strongest person in the world.
Martin Luther King Jr. – We must learn to live together as brothers or we will perish together as fools.
Mahatma Gandhi – The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.
Abdul Kalaam – It is very easy to defeat someone, but it is very hard to win someone.

If nothing else, research into the veracity of these quotes should provide some amusing text to go between the pictures. When you go looking in the land of google, there is no telling what you will find. During this expedition, the first page rule will be in effect. Only results on the first google page will be considered. The NB quote has 1.7 million results, which is too much work.

Lets begin with Willie the shake. Did he really say “Never play with the feelings of others because you may win the game but the risk is that you will surely lose the person for a life time.”? Or, as they say in the Yahoo village, Does anyone know where this Shakespeare quote comes from?

hugeshantz Does anyone know where this Shakespeare quote comes from? I’ve seen this quote all over the internet, always attributed to Shakespeare, but I can’t find a legitimate source of where it comes from (i.e. a specific sonnet, play, speech, etc.): “Never play….” Can anyone help me out here?

Dude the Obscure This is 20th/21st century psychobabble. Shakespeare never wrote anything remotely resembling that. Please never trust any of these idiotic “internet quote sites.” They are all, all, all crap. I can’t believe that any intelligent person could think for a minute that this was written by Shakespeare. Really. Get some critical-thinking skills, child.

The next quote is by Napoleon Bonaparte, not Napoleon Dynamite. “The world suffers a lot. Not because of the violence of bad people, but because of the silence of good people.”

Before we consider the veracity of this quote, lets consider two things. NB did not speak english, so there is likely to be translation confusion. Second, the wars NB started caused widepread suffering. Little of this suffering was caused by the silence of good people.

The sources on page one do little except show the quote, usually with the credit going to NB. No one shows when or where he said it, or in what context. Brainyquotes doea not show it on the NB pages.

Number three is from Albert Einstein.” I am thankful to all those who said NO to me. Its because of them I did it myself.” According to Shelly Winters, Marilyn Monroe did not say no to Dr. Einstein. Google has a doozy of a forum, Misquoting Einstein?.

Jimmy Snyder says the quote has been attributed to Dorothy Parker, Yogi Berra, William Shakespeare, The Bible, Benjamin Franklin, and Groucho Marx. This is a clue that the quote is bogus.

zoobyshoe’s I just found this an another wiki page discussing the quote page: “I am thankful …” This is being attributed to Einstein on the Internet, but it appears to come from Wayne W. Dyer’s book You’ll See It When You Believe It, page 54, according to Google Books. Dyer does not attribute it to Einstein, but mentions Einstein in the same paragraph. “In my office I have two framed posters. One is a picture of Albert Einstein, beneath which are the words “Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds.” The other poster is made up solely of words: “I am grateful to all those people who said no. It is because of them I did it myself.” Great thoughts!”

Ryan_m_b’s “Never believe quotes you read on the internet” – Winston Churchill zoobyshoe’s His actual words were: “The internet has nothing to offer, but blood, tears, toil, and misquotes.”

It should not be surprising that Winston Churchill finds his way into this discussion. He has a taste for the spotlight, even 47 years after his demise. He is an example of how truthiness is sometimes all you need. His most famous speech was a radio address during a bad part of World War Two. The speech was read by an actor. England was inspired, and went on to win the war. Why should anyone worry if an actor gave his speech for him?

This is enough fun for one day. There will be a part two soon, and it will probably be full of number two. Pictures today are from The Library of Congress.











Welcome to part two of the Chamblee54 due diligence report on the Seven Brilliant Quotes. In part one, we checked out the first three. At no time was a source for the quote found. All three are suspect, with “misunderstanding” indicated in the Albert Einstein quote. It is amazing how quickly accepted these sayings are by the inspiration hungry public.

Getting back to business, did Abraham Lincoln say “If friendship is your weakest point then you are the strongest person in the world.” There are lots of links to this quote, in a variety of fonts and colors. Some have spectacular photography in the background. However, none of these links has a source for this quote, or any indication of the context.

Wikiquotes has 43,444 words about Abraham Lincoln. PG copied these words, and did a search for the word “friendship”. The quote from the poster was not found. The meme is missing. This wikiquotes test has been very useful for checking out quotes. It is not authoritative, but is a good place to start.

This type of research can be frustrating. Being inspired by beautiful words can give you strength and purpose. It can also make you feel foolish, when the lovely words are revealed to be lies. Being a cynic gets lonely. Children of all ages don’t like to be told that there is no Santa Claus.

The good news is that number five is for real. Martin Luther King gave a speech at Western Michigan University in 1963. There is a probably his standard speech, given many times. The second section of the speech is “Call for action.”

“The world in which we live is geographically one. Now we are challenged to make it one in terms of brotherhood. Now through our ethical and moral commitment, we must make of it a brotherhood. We must all learn to live together as brothers or we will perish together as fools. This is the great challenge of the hour. This is true of individuals. It is true of nations. No individual can live alone. No nation can live alone.”

“I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality. [W]e’re challenged after working in the realm of ideas, to move out into the arena of social action and to work passionately and unrelentingly to make racial justice a reality.”

“[W]e must never substitute a doctrine of Black supremacy for white supremacy. For the doctrine of Black supremacy is as dangerous as white supremacy. God is not interested merely in the freedom of black men and brown men and yellow men but God is interested in the freedom of the whole human race, the creation of a society where all men will live together as brothers.”

PG has written about the problem of quoting Mohandas Gandhi before. Supposedly he said “I love your Christ, but I dislike your Christianity.” PG thinks this is a fabrication.

The quote on the poster is “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” Wikiquotes has a link to Collected Works of Mahatma Gandhi Online. The next stop is page 302 of this section. Mr. Gandhi gave an “Interview to the press” in Karachi, on March 26, 1931. A freedom fighter named Bhagat Singh had been executed by the British three days earlier.

Do you not think it impolitic to forgive a government which has been guilty of a thousand murders?
I do not know a single instance where forgiveness has been found so wanting as to be impolitic.
But no country has ever shown such forgiveness as India is showing to Britain?
That does not affect my reply. What is true of individuals is true of nations. One cannot forgive too much. The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.

The bottom line is from Dr. Abdul Kalam. (The name is misspelled on the poster.) The phrase is “It is very easy to defeat someone, but it is very hard to win someone.” Many viewers have no idea who this person is. Once again, Wikiquotes comes to the rescue. “Dr. Avul Pakir Jainulabdeen Abdul Kalam (born 15 October 1931) Indian scientist and engineer; 11th President of India; generally referred to as Dr. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam.” The quotes are from Wings of Fire: An Autobiography of APJ Abdul Kalam.

A search for the word “defeat” did not show results. A search for “win” shows a few, but not the poster child. The phrase on the poster is also credited to John Keats. There is also the story of the student who argues with an atheist professor, and ultimately wins. The student is sometimes said to be Albert Einstein. In this version, Argumnent : What, Who is GOD?, the coda is “This seems to be a true story, and the student was none other than APJ Abdul Kalam, the former President of India “.

The research for part one consisted of entering the quote into a search engine. It was not until the Lincoln investigation that the method of copying wikiquote, and searching for a key word, was discovered. Out of a sense of fairness, the first three quotes will be investigated using this method.

For William Shakespeare, the search word was risk. There were no results. For Napoleon Bonaparte, the search word was violence. There was one result. “There is no such thing as an absolute despotism; it is only relative. A man cannot wholly free himself from obligation to his fellows, and not the one on the poster. For Albert Einstein, the search word was thankful. There were no results.

So, there are seven quotes in the motivational poster. Only two of the seven have a apparent source. Pictures today are from The Library of Congress. This is a repost. This version is edited, out of concern for the attention span of the audience.










A Prophet And His Honor

Posted in Library of Congress, Quotes, Religion by chamblee54 on August 16, 2016

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PG was editing pictures, listening to the birds and the lawn mowers, and enjoying himself. He began to think about recent events, both global and local. A phrase came to mind, about a prophet who is not without honor, except in his own land. Wasn’t Jesus supposed to have said that? Before you could say algorithm, there were 1.6 million choices. This is a repost.

The quote is in three of the four gospels. In all of these quotes, Jesus is not received as Lord and savior. It is interesting to see the authors of Matthew, Mark, and Luke agree on this. It is noteworthy that the Council of Nicea decided to include it. Here are the three quotes.

Matthew 13 55 Is not this the carpenter’s son? is not his mother called Mary? and his brethren, James, and Joses, and Simon, and Judas? 56 And his sisters, are they not all with us? Whence then hath this man all these things? 57 And they were offended in him. But Jesus said unto them, A prophet is not without honour, save in his own country, and in his own house. 58 And he did not many mighty works there because of their unbelief.

Mark 6 3 Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? And they were offended at him. 4 But Jesus said unto them, A prophet is not without honour, but in his own country, and among his own kin, and in his own house. 5 And he could there do no mighty work, save that he laid his hands upon a few sick folk, and healed them. 6 And he marvelled because of their unbelief…

Luke 4 22 And all bare him witness, and wondered at the gracious words which proceeded out of his mouth. And they said, Is not this Joseph’s son? 23 And he said unto them, Ye will surely say unto me this proverb, Physician, heal thyself: whatsoever we have heard done in Capernaum, do also here in thy country. 24 And he said, Verily I say unto you, No prophet is accepted in his own country.

The historic Jesus, as portrayed in the Bible, is a flawed messenger. He apparently did not have the trust of the people. Jesus did not have a problem with false modesty. John 14:6 Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.

PG heard a motivational speaker once. He said to sell yourself first, your company second, and your product third. If you are going to win someone over, the person needs to trust you. You cannot call yourself a prophet, and expect them to believe you because your message is so wonderful. This is a concept that Jesus might have had a problem with. Many believers today have the same problem.

Jesus is worshiped as a G-d these days. Modern Christians are more interested in his death, than in his life. The worship of Jesus has devolved into a scheme for life after death. Those who decline to participate in this religion can expect to be insulted. It is a curious sales pitch. Pictures are from The Library of Congress. The agencies were Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information.

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Cam Newton

Posted in GSU photo archive, Quotes, Race by chamblee54 on August 15, 2016

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It is a slow news day tradition. Some magazine has an article coming out. A few eye catching quotes are leaked. The internet has a collective hissy fit. Today, it was GQ, and the article was: Cam Newton on Those Versace Pants, Race in America, and Whether He Would Let His Kid Play Football

PG was known as Cam, short for Campbell, not for the car part, most of his life. PG has long been leery of Cam Newton. Number One has a preacher father, went to school at Auburn, and seems to be a bit of a hot dog. If you look at today’s GQ event, you will see Mr. Newton modelling a selection of pricy threads. Those fashion photos may say more about the personality of Mr. Newton than the article black twitter is wigging out about. (How many tweeters have read the GQ article?)

The article is fashion magazine purple prose. Here is a sample. This was a couple of paragraphs before the money quote: “:…The Charlotte Observer, a wonderful newspaper that’s kept its lights on during this di∞cult time for newspapers thanks in part to reactionary complaints about Cam Newton. … An honest question: Can you name a contemporary athlete who has been subjected to more veiled and sometimes outright racism than Cam Newton? Is this even a controversial opinion, to think that Cam lives in a world of coded and not-so-coded critiques that basically boil down to resentment about the existence of such a sublime black quarterback? … Maybe today he woke up and felt like being just a quarterback, not a black quarterback. Maybe he feels fatigue at having to have this conversation with any random reporter who thinks he’s entitled to his thoughts on this subject. … Maybe he just didn’t feel like participating in the whole economy of outrage that surrounds him today.”

As you may have heard, Mr. Newton said something about racism. Here is the actual quote:
“Your now former teammate Josh Norman said last year, “I’m going to be precise when I say it: It’s hate.” His response may be somebody else’s response, but that’s not how I feel. Do you feel like football fans are racist toward you? It’s not racism. Everybody’s entitled to their own opinion. So if it’s not that, what is it, do you think? I’ll let you be the judge. I don’t look at it like that. I look at it like some people have certain beliefs, and I have my own belief, and we can agree to disagree on certain things. But this is what makes sports so amazing, that we can start a discussion around a table, in the newspaper, in the magazines, that will get people’s attention. And that’s what sports does. In January, right before the Super Bowl, you said: “I’m an African-American QB that may scare a lot of people because they haven’t seen nothing that they can compare me to.” I don’t want this to be about race, because it’s not. It’s not. Like, we’re beyond that. As a nation.”
@HiiiPoweredSoul So Cam Newton tuckin his tail to avoid controversy? I expected better. Especially bc of all the racist comments thrown at him.
@theintlfiles 5m5 Cam Newton was partially right when it came to criticism of himself, but my man was dead wrong when it came to the “post racism” society.
@KiamberNicole • welp. Cam Newton is officially a part of the ashy coon community.
@OhLordTaylore Wasn’t looking for Cam Newton to be an activist or anything, but to come out and say something as ignorant as we’re past racism? Smdh ‏
@SonofBaldwin Remember how we had #CamNewton’s back too, when all those white folks came for his throat? For him to just sell us down the river for it…
mariaj81 Some negroes think that just because they have some coins that race no longer applies to them. Im looking at you, Cam Newton

Later in the interview, Mr. Newton says that Donald Trump is ” an unbelievable businessperson.” The author, Zach Baron, tries to get Mr. Newton to comment on North Carolina’s “bathroom bill.” Mr. Newton declines a comment. “But that’s too personal. That’s when you put the microscope to the person. But overall, I don’t care. Man, in my circle, and especially growing up in Atlanta, you see everything! … Sometimes I talk too much.”

Pictures today are from “The Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library”.

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Trump or Jesus?

Posted in GSU photo archive, Politics, Quotes, Religion by chamblee54 on August 5, 2016

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There is a facebook thingie this morning, Trump or Jesus? When creating the document for this feature, windows decided not to *save* the document with the T 0r J title. That is an omen.

The idea is simple. You get a quote, in contemporary english. You choose whether it was said by Jesus, or Trump. Jesus is in a blue box, while Trump is red. White letters are used for both choices. Those who think Christ is the last name will be confused.

“Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth.” Matthew 5:5.
“My IQ is one of the highest… Please don’t feel so stupid or insecure; it’s not your fault.” source
“You know, it really doesn’t matter what the media write as long as you’ve got a young, and beautiful, piece of ass.” source
“Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another.” John 13:34.
“If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also.” Matthew 5:39
“If you see somebody getting ready to throw a tomato, knock the crap out of them, would you? Seriously, okay?” source
“If you want to be perfect, go, sell your possessions and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven.” Matthew 19:20
“The point is that you can’t be too greedy.” source
“But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.” John 13:34
“The other thing with the terrorists is you have to take out their families, when you get these terrorists, you have to take out their families.” source

This is not a tough test. It is even easier here, with Bible verses for one, and links for another. Jesus did not tweet. The media, IQ, and Terrorist are modern phrases. (There is evidence that the phrase terrorist was coined by the Jewish rebels fighting to create the state of Israel. Ben Hecht wrote a fund raising ad, Letter to the Terrorists of Palestine. It “appeared on page 42 of the May 14, 1947 edition of the New York Post.”)

We do not know what translation was used in this test. Jesus spoke Aramaic, which was recorded in Greek, and endlessly translated. There are stories of editing by the Catholic church. Many scholars question the validity of some Gospels, especially John. While Jesus may have said something like these verses, they are not verbatim quotes.

Pictures are from “The Special Collections and Archives, Georgia State University Library”.

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